Do you love fall as much as I do? The smell of pumpkin and cinnamon in the air. The colors of the season. Cooler temperatures. Halloween! I could go on and on. And there are so many fun family activities to do in the fall. S’mores. Hay rides. Haunted houses. Corn mazes. Apple picking and pumpkin picking are two of my favorites! It’s a tradition for my family. And I bet it is for yours too. Both of them present some amazing photo opps.

Today I want to share with you 3 simple tips to help you photograph your fall in a fun, creative way. Then, I’d love to invite you to download my newest guide. You’ll find even more tips for those weekends when you’re out checking items off your fall bucket list.

1. Try an Interesting Perspective

One of the easiest ways to make your photos more creative is to experiment with different angles and perspectives. Try shooting from above your subject or underneath. Shoot from behind or look for something to shoot through like tree branches or a doorway. Get down low to include more of the foreground. Shoot over the shoulder of your subject to get a peak at what they’re doing. Simple changes can make a big impact!

2. Take a Fun Portrait

To me, fall means fun. Yes, I want you to capture photos of who you’re with and the memories you’re creating, but I also want you to have fun with it. I’ve got two ideas for you. Most of the time portraits are photos of people smiling. Let’s mix it up. Try a faceless portrait. See what you can come up with. Ask the kids for ideas, I think this is an activity that they’d have fun with. You can also bring a prop with you the next time you’re out apple or pumpkin picking. It can be something as simple as a sun hat or bag. In the first photo, I brought along a colorful blanket and a small basket. The apples and pumpkins themselves can make for fun props!

3. Take an Action Shot

I think our first thought is always to get the posed, smiling-at-the-camera shot from any event we go to. And while I love that and always go for that too, I also try and capture the fun of the day as well. Keep snapping as the kids are exploring the pumpkin patch, running through the corn maze or reaching up to pick an apple. Maybe they’re laughing on a bumpy hay ride or trying to lift a heavy pumpkin. Anytime they are in motion or lost in the moment, take the shot.

Want to know more easy tips for photographing your fall? Grab my newest guide with bonus tips on details, leading lines, and finding good light. Just click on the image below!

simple photo tips for more creative fall photos
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Olivia is still in that phase where she puts everything in her mouth so it’s hard to do fun crafts and activities with her, BUT that doesn’t stop me from trying. I just make sure my expectations are low!

I saw this idea on the blog Better As Us and loved the idea to cover the high chair in foil. Genius! This controls the mess and you can fit it to any high chair tray.

When I sat her down the first thing she tried to do was pull it up, but I quickly discouraged her and redirected her attention to the paint brushes. I squirted a few dollops of paint on a paper plate and showed her how to dip the brush in. Then, I held her hand and helped her put the paint on the pumpkin. Her favorite part was dipping the brush in the paint. I had to keep reminding her to put it on the pumpkin.

Overall, the activity lasted less than 10 minutes before she started painting her hands, face, and body. Still, we ended up with an adorable pumpkin to decorate the house.

Tips for Painting Pumpkins with your toddler

-Make sure everything is ready before you begin. Get out your paint, brushes, and some wipes for clean up.

-Make sure your little one is wearing a bib or onesie that you don’t care about getting dirty.

-Rotate the pumpkin for them so they are not paiting the same spot over and over.

Photo Tips for capturing fun activities with your kids

-Set your activity up in an area with lots of natural light.

-Make sure your little one is facing the light, especially if you’re using a smartphone to take pictures.

-Move around and capture a few different angles. Take a wide angle view and then get in close. Move in even closer for details of the brush, the pumpkin and their little hands.

-Don’t forget a photo of the finished product (like I did!)

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